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Self Help

coldWe are keen to help patients improve on self help and hope that the following information will offer some insight into that.

Take a look and see if you can improve your own understanding of your health and well-being! Please encourage others to look here too.

Here is a list of ailments that can be safely self managed. You will see that you can take a look via the hyperlink at the other websites which can offer you further information about managing your condition.

Common ailments that can be self managed :

Back pain

NHS Choices

Cold sores

NHS Choices

Common Cold

NHS Choices

Conjunctivitis

NHS Choices

pdfInformation Leaflet

Constipation

NHS Choices

Cough

NHS Choices

pdf Information Leaflet

Diarrhoea

NHS Choices

Dysmenorrhoea (painful periods)

NHS Choices

Earache

NHS Choices

Haemorrhoids

NHS Choices  

Hayfever

NHS Choices

Head lice

NHS Choices

Headache

NHS Choices

Heartburn & Indigestion

NHS Choices

Influenza

NHS Choices

pdf Information Leaflet

Insect bites

NHS Choices

Migraine

NHS Choices

Nasal congestion

NHS Choices

Nappy rash

NHS Choices

Sore throat

NHS Choices

pdf Information Leaflet

Sinusitis

NHS Choices

Sprains and strains

NHS Choices

Thrush

NHS Choices

Warts and Verrucas

NHS Choices

Worsening signs of a Sick Child

When checking your child use good light. Consider their usual skin colour as darker skinned children do not always look pale. As parents you know your child best; Trust your own instincts. 

Other useful websites

www.nhs.net

www.sepsistrust.org

www.meningitis.org

Signs to look out for

For further information on treatment of common childhood illnesses you can view or download the local NHS ‘Your Guide to Childhood Illnesses’.  A handy guide on common childhood illnesses for parents of children under six, it also has information about spotting the signs of a serious illness and local NHS services.

link to the guide is:
https://www.cambridgeshireandpeterboroughccg.nhs.uk/news-and-events/leaflets-and-guides/your-guide-to-childhood-illnesses

Stocking up your medicine cabinet

The following tables contain useful medicines and dressings that could be kept in a home medicine chest. All are quite cheap to buy in pharmacies, and worth keeping at home for minor illnesses.

Family Medicine Chest Contents:

General Items:                      

Scissors

Tweezers

Thermometer

Travel Sickness Pills

Your Doctor's Emergency Telephone Number

Record of last Tetanus Vaccination

General Pain Killers:

For Adults

E.g. Aspirin, Paracetomol, Ibuprofen

For Children

Paracetamol suspension (E.g. Calpol etc)

Note: Never give Aspirin if under 16 years of age.

Cuts & Grazes:

Plasters

Gauze Dressing

Sticky Tape

Cotton Wool

Antiseptic Cleansing Solution

Antiseptic Cream

Sprains:

Tubigrip or Crepe Bandage

Eyes:

Eyebath

Sterile Water or 'Optrex'

Insect Bites & Stings, Allergies & Sunburn:

Antihistamine Tablets

Hydrocortisone Cream

Insect Repellant Spray

 

Stomach Upsets & Indigestion:

Electrolyte Replacement Sachets (for dehydration)

Anti-Diarrhoea Tablets (Not for Children)

Tablets for Indigestion (E.g. Magnesium trisilicate)

 

Rashes:

Calamine Lotion

Cough Mixtures:

There is no evidence that cough mixtures work so we rarely prescribe them and suggest you save your money ! Soothing drinks can be made.

Mouth Ulcer Treatments:

Mouth Ulcers:

Choline Salicylate Gel (E.g. Bonjela) may help.

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Guide to Independent Living in Cambridgeshire

There is a useful guide which includes comprehensive lists of all CQC registered care providers across Cambridgeshire as well as information on funding care, understanding the assessment process, staying independent, dementia care services and much more.

Please fine the link below:

https://www.carechoices.co.uk/publication/cambridgeshire-guide-to-independent-living/

Heading off to university or have children starting university?

Whether you’re a fresher or heading into your final year, or a parent of a university student, we have a few basic health care tips for students.

1. Get the ACWY vaccine – it protects against four different strains of the meningococcal bacteria that cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia): A, C, W and Y. Ask your GP practice for the vaccine.

2. Register with a GP when you get to university. You never know when you might need medical help. If you take any regular medicines that are only available on prescription, for example the contraceptive pill, make sure you have enough to last the term or until you can register with a doctor close the university.

3. Take a first aid kit with you. It might not be the most exciting thing to pack but a first aid kit with plasters, painkillers, treat for upset stomachs, thermometer, tweezers, insect bite cream or spray and antiseptic cream is a good start.



 
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